Arch Linux Hydra Build

For a long time now I’ve been wanting to build my ideal computer. A powerful Linux machine with surrounding monitors. Recently I had the opportunity to do so. The following is a time lapse video of the entire build as well as the configuration files and list of components and where to buy them. This way, if anyone else wants to construct either the same or something along the same lines, they’ll have some footsteps to follow if they need the help.

During the trial and error process there were little milestones along the way.

Finally I got everything working correctly and the Hydra came to life.

Build Components

The following is a list of all the components used in this build along with links to purchase.

#archlinux #hydra the calm before the storm. #Linux

A photo posted by Jason Graves (@godlikemouse) on

On to part three of the Linux Hydra setup, the heads. 24” monitors all around.

A photo posted by Jason Graves (@godlikemouse) on

Part 2 wire maintenance of the Linux Hydra complete.

A photo posted by Jason Graves (@godlikemouse) on

Physical Configuration

I went with Dual Nvidia Quadro K620 video cards because they were very inexpensive and had the ability to display up to 4 monitors per video card via daisy chain through DisplayPort 1.2.  The monitors that I found that were pretty inexpensive however didn’t support direct daisy chaining so I had to purchase 2 multi monitor display adapters which essentially did the daisy chaining.  Physically, this is the setup.

GPU 1 DisplayPort Splitter 1 Monitor 1
Monitor 2
Monitor 3
Monitor 4
GPU 2 DisplayPort Splitter 2 Monitor 5
Monitor 6
Monitor 7
Monitor 8

 

Xorg Configuration

My chosen distribution for this build was Arch Linux, yours maybe different however, the Xorg configuration should be similar if not identical if you’re using the same components.  If not, then perhaps this might just help you along the way.

My first setup was using the nvidia proprietary driver, installed by the following:

user@computer:$ yaourt nvidia-beta-all

This driver set didn’t have Base Mosaic nor Xinerama working.  Everytime it was turned on the screen would black out and I would have to hard reset the machine and manually remove the settings.

Visually what I was setting up as 2 screens, one for the first GPU and another for the second.  The use of nvidia-settings made this very painless, I suggest you use it as well if you’re using Nvidia cards.

user@computer:$ sudo pacman -S nvidia-settings
user@computer:$ sudo nvidia-settings

Once you save the changes to the Xorg.conf file, you should be able to see the file located at /etc/X11/xorg.conf.

Here’s a visual representation of my screen Xorg setup.

Screen0 Screen1
Monitor 1 Monitor 2 Monitor 5 Monitor 6
Monitor 3 Monitor 4 Monitor 7 Monitor 8

Hopefully this helps in understanding what I was trying to achieve. This gave great results and allowed me to get all monitors working however, there were two issues with this setup.

The first, getting a graphical environment to support eight monitors was a bit troublesome at first. I started off using Gnome 3, tried KDE, etc. yet none of them supported anything other than a dual monitor setup. Also, xrandr did nothing to help here and even reported that the second GPU wasn’t available which was absolutely not the case. The solution here was to install a different desktop which supported multiple monitors. I went with XFCE4.

The second, windows could only be moved in the screen in which the window was created. In other words, a window created in Screen0 could only move through monitors 1-4. This became more of a problem over time and was resolved later. Here’s my first working Xorg.conf file.

# nvidia-settings: X configuration file generated by nvidia-settings
# nvidia-settings: version 370.28 (buildmeister@swio-display-x64-rhel04-17) Thu Sep 1 20:21:47 PDT 2016
 
Section "ServerLayout"
 Identifier "Layout0"
 Screen 0 "Screen0" 0 0
 Screen 1 "Screen1" 3840 0
 InputDevice "Keyboard0" "CoreKeyboard"
 InputDevice "Mouse0" "CorePointer"
 Option "Xinerama" "0"
EndSection
 
Section "Files"
EndSection
 
Section "InputDevice"
 # generated from default
 Identifier "Mouse0"
 Driver "mouse"
 Option "Protocol" "auto"
 Option "Device" "/dev/psaux"
 Option "Emulate3Buttons" "no"
 Option "ZAxisMapping" "4 5"
EndSection
 
Section "InputDevice"
 # generated from default
 Identifier "Keyboard0"
 Driver "kbd"
EndSection
 
Section "Monitor"
 # HorizSync source: edid, VertRefresh source: edid
 Identifier "Monitor0"
 VendorName "Unknown"
 ModelName "Ancor Communications Inc VE248"
 HorizSync 30.0 - 83.0
 VertRefresh 50.0 - 76.0
 Option "DPMS"
EndSection
 
Section "Monitor"
 # HorizSync source: edid, VertRefresh source: edid
 Identifier "Monitor1"
 VendorName "Unknown"
 ModelName "Ancor Communications Inc VE248"
 HorizSync 30.0 - 83.0
 VertRefresh 50.0 - 76.0
 Option "DPMS"
EndSection
 
Section "Device"
 Identifier "Device0"
 Driver "nvidia"
 VendorName "NVIDIA Corporation"
 BoardName "Quadro K620"
 BusID "PCI:1:0:0"
EndSection
 
Section "Device"
 Identifier "Device1"
 Driver "nvidia"
 VendorName "NVIDIA Corporation"
 BoardName "Quadro K620"
 BusID "PCI:2:0:0"
EndSection
 
Section "Screen"
 Identifier "Screen0"
 Device "Device0"
 Monitor "Monitor0"
 DefaultDepth 24
 Option "Stereo" "0"
 Option "nvidiaXineramaInfoOrder" "DFP-2.2.1"
 Option "metamodes" "DP-1.2.1: nvidia-auto-select +1920+1080, DP-1.2.2: nvidia-auto-select +0+1080, DP-1.1.1: nvidia-auto-select +1920+0, DP-1.1.2: nvidia-auto-select +0+0"
 Option "SLI" "Off"
 Option "MultiGPU" "Off"
 Option "BaseMosaic" "off"
 SubSection "Display"
 Depth 24
 EndSubSection
EndSection
 
Section "Screen"
 Identifier "Screen1"
 Device "Device1"
 Monitor "Monitor1"
 DefaultDepth 24
 Option "Stereo" "0"
 Option "metamodes" "DP-1.2.1: nvidia-auto-select +0+0, DP-1.2.2: nvidia-auto-select +1920+0, DP-1.1.1: nvidia-auto-select +0+1080, DP-1.1.2: nvidia-auto-select +1920+1080"
 Option "SLI" "Off"
 Option "MultiGPU" "Off"
 Option "BaseMosaic" "off"
 SubSection "Display"
 Depth 24
 EndSubSection
EndSection

The above configuration eventually became a bit problematic and reached out to NVidia to find out if there was anything that could be done to get Base Mosaic and Xinerama working in their driver.  The response I received was to try using the following driver:

http://www.nvidia.com/download/driverResults.aspx/106780/en-us

This turned out be very helpful.  Once the driver was installed I once again turned on Base Mosaic and to my surprise the entire panel of screens were being utilized under a single Screen0 entry.  This made it possible to drag windows from Monitor 1 all the way across to Monitor 8.

Screen0
Monitor 1 Monitor 2 Monitor 5 Monitor 6
Monitor 3 Monitor 4 Monitor 7 Monitor 8

This final Xorg.conf file is what I decided to keep and use going forward.

# nvidia-settings: X configuration file generated by nvidia-settings
# nvidia-settings: version 367.44 (buildmeister@swio-display-x86-rhel47-01) Wed Aug 17 22:53:32 PDT 2016
 
Section "ServerLayout"
 Identifier "Layout0"
 Screen 0 "Screen0" 0 0
 InputDevice "Keyboard0" "CoreKeyboard"
 InputDevice "Mouse0" "CorePointer"
 Option "Xinerama" "0"
EndSection
 
Section "Files"
EndSection
 
Section "InputDevice"
 # generated from default
 Identifier "Mouse0"
 Driver "mouse"
 Option "Protocol" "auto"
 Option "Device" "/dev/psaux"
 Option "Emulate3Buttons" "no"
 Option "ZAxisMapping" "4 5"
EndSection
 
Section "InputDevice"
 # generated from default
 Identifier "Keyboard0"
 Driver "kbd"
EndSection
 
Section "Monitor"
 # HorizSync source: edid, VertRefresh source: edid
 Identifier "Monitor0"
 VendorName "Unknown"
 ModelName "Ancor Communications Inc VE248"
 HorizSync 30.0 - 83.0
 VertRefresh 50.0 - 76.0
 Option "DPMS"
EndSection
 
Section "Device"
 Identifier "Device0"
 Driver "nvidia"
 VendorName "NVIDIA Corporation"
 BoardName "Quadro K620"
 BusID "PCI:1:0:0"
EndSection
 
Section "Screen"
 Identifier "Screen0"
 Device "Device0"
 Monitor "Monitor0"
 DefaultDepth 24
 Option "Stereo" "0"
 Option "nvidiaXineramaInfoOrder" "DFP-2.2.1"
 Option "metamodes" "GPU-05f6316a-a480-b2c4-7618-d19e2bd555aa.GPU-0.DP-1.2.1: nvidia-auto-select +1920+1080, GPU-05f6316a-a480-b2c4-7618-d19e2bd555aa.GPU-0.DP-1.2.2: nvidia-auto-select +0+1080, GPU-05f6316a-a480-b2c4-7618-d19e2bd555aa.GPU-0.DP-1.1.1: nvidia-auto-select +1920+0, GPU-05f6316a-a480-b2c4-7618-d19e2bd555aa.GPU-0.DP-1.1.2: nvidia-auto-select +0+0, GPU-0cc1f3f6-5d22-fe69-aa54-cb7c8c051daa.GPU-1.DP-1.2.1: nvidia-auto-select +3840+0, GPU-0cc1f3f6-5d22-fe69-aa54-cb7c8c051daa.GPU-1.DP-1.2.2: nvidia-auto-select +5760+0, GPU-0cc1f3f6-5d22-fe69-aa54-cb7c8c051daa.GPU-1.DP-1.1.1: nvidia-auto-select +3840+1080, GPU-0cc1f3f6-5d22-fe69-aa54-cb7c8c051daa.GPU-1.DP-1.1.2: nvidia-auto-select +5760+1080"
 Option "MultiGPU" "Off"
 Option "SLI" "off"
 Option "BaseMosaic" "on"
 SubSection "Display"
 Depth 24
 EndSubSection
EndSection

I hope this helps anyone who gets stuck trying to get multiple monitors working under Linux using Nvidia video cards.  Please feel free to drop me a line if you get stuck and I’ll see what I can do to help.

32 thoughts on “Arch Linux Hydra Build

  1. Malcolm Dean

    What about Wayland? When X goes away, will you have to redo a configuration file? I found that Fedora had the best configuration tool, but would not retain settings for my four monitors.

    Reply
    1. godlikemouse Post author

      Hi Malcolm,

      I’m not sure, it really depends on the details of its implementation. I was unable to get Wayland to work at all with multiple monitors. I’m hoping moving forward that they realize most modern setups are going to require multi-monitor support to some degree. Regarding configuration, I just used the nvidia-xcconfig and nvidia-settings tools. They made customization and position of the monitors painless, even with my setup.

      Reply
      1. Malcolm Dean

        There are two components to my findings.

        1. Linux can “brick” some computers. Read this:

        http://www.shallowsky.com/linux/x-screen-blanking.html

        If the backlight turns off, the problem isn’t the hardware: it’s just that Xorg, for reasons unknown, isn’t really using DPMS when it says it will. A little googling showed dozens of people reporting this on video cards from at least four different manufacturers, so it’s not an isolated occurrence. Nobody seems to have an explanation or a cure. Some people say that eventually the backlight does turn off, but with a delay much much longer than the one that’s set (e.g. they set the off timeout to 10 minutes, and their screen blanks at 10 minutes, then the backlight finally turns off at 30 minutes or an hour). That’s not really very useful, and it doesn’t even happen on all machines. On my laptop, even that doesn’t seem to happen; the backlight stays on for as long as I’ve tested it.

        [ The blanking can also be triggered by re-orienting one monitor. I have four 4K monitors, and I disconnected one to achieve a fairly “standard” setup. But when I rotate the remaining third monitor 90 degrees, all screens go blank immediately. — Malcolm ]

        My workstation is now effectively “bricked” because no matter what OS I install, the screens go blank after a few minutes. This applies to Ubuntu, Antergos,Mint 18.1, MX-16, etc., etc. … I have no idea what setting could possibly persist past wiping the drive and installing a completely new distro. It’s a mystery.

        2. It appears that distributions are not tested with more than three monitors, and often the three monitors are tested only in landscape orientation, not mixed orientation:

        3. With my four 27″ Dell and Acer hidef monitors, I tested about a dozen current distros from Fedora 25 to Ubuntu 16.04/16.10 to Debian and Arch derivatives. The results were similar for my Nvidia M.2000 and AMD W5100 cards.

        4. NO distro could configure AND RETAIN a four-monitor setup. Fedora 25 has the best configuration utility by far, but it will not save the configuration for the next boot. See these Red Hat bugs:

        https://bugzilla.redhat.com/show_bug.cgi?id=1341529
        https://bugzilla.redhat.com/buglist.cgi?component=xorg-x11-drv-ati&product=Red%20Hat%20Enterprise%20Linux%206

        5. The utility found in Ubuntu, Mint, and others does not easily move and re-orient the monitors. Mint will recognize three monitors, but the fourth monitor simply blinks on and off. Sometimes, when re-orienting the monitors and saving the configuration incrementally, when the fourth monitor was re-oriented and the configuration saved, the workstation went dark and unusuable. A cold reboot would allow several more minutes of usability.

        6. Back in 2016, a consultant investigated this problem for me, and reported: “That’s the same bug that happened to me earlier– it doesn’t reboot, it logs you out and back in.” He eventually got Mint 17.3 working with the old AMD driver by editing the X conf file. I was forced to upgrade 17.3 for other (USB and new AMD drivers) issues, and have found nothing that works properly ever since.

        7. I am very sad to say that Linux and/or X have failed me completely. My workstation has now been out of service for about 60 days. To claim to be a modern, capable desktop OS, Linux should be able to automagically recognize, orient, and save, more than four mixed monitors.

        Reply
        1. godlikemouse Post author

          Hi Malcolm,

          I’ve yet to see Linux ever brick a machine. I’ve seen Linux installed incorrectly or not functioning properly due to updates, but I never seen Linux destroy hardware. One thing to keep in mind is that newer monitors are no longer just monitors. Many of them are now smart to semi-smart monitors which remember connections and persist/cache setting options. If I were you I would do the following:

          First exit Xorg.
          Once at the command line and once you can see your terminal on at least one monitor, rotate your screens.
          Next, go into your xconfig and modify you monitor section appropriately to reflect you new settings / monitor rotation settings.
          If you don’t know how to do that, then just disable them in the xconfig then load Xorg back up.
          Once Xorg is back up, run a UI utility to handle the setup more gracefully. I recommend using a utility directly for the video card chipset you are using. For example: I use nvidia-settings.
          Your graphics specific application should allow you to reconfigure rotated screens, etc. pretty painlessly.

          If you need any assistance in this area or more specifics, please feel free to ask.

          One last thing, which desktop are you trying to run 4 monitors on? I’ve found that many don’t support anything more than 2-3 monitors well. One that does not seem to care how many monitors you throw at it is XFCE4 if you’d like to give that a try.

          Reply
          1. Malcolm

            Before editing X, I have to achieve a usable machine. As with the link I included, the machine runs for several minutes, then goes blank. I wiped the boot partition and installed a new OS, but the condition persists, as noted in the shallow sky link. Other users have experienced this, on various hardware.
            Re X, why would Mint see only three monitors, leaving the fourth flashing on and off. Is that an X effect?

          2. godlikemouse Post author

            Hi Malcolm,

            This is sounding more and more like hardware failure to me. I’m assuming you’re not overclocking, if you are go back to default voltages and settings and try that. Otherwise, if your Linux install is still unstable in TTY mode without even launching X, then I would start investigating hardware issues. First and foremost, make sure you have enough power to drive all of your devices. Ensure your PSU can power your monitor setup. You can either add up the voltage and do the math or the easiest way to test this of course is to remove all but one monitor. If the issue still persists, then move deeper into pulling hardware. I’d personally start with RAM at that point, remove all but one stick. If the issue still persists swap RAM. If you’re absolutely certain that it’s a Linux issue after trying what I’ve suggested. Then I would install Windows 10, it’s free for a few days until you have to register it which would give you enough time to ensure that it’s not a hardware configuration issue. If Windows 10 barfs, then it’s definitely a hardware issue. Otherwise if it works fine, then it’s probably a configuration issue. In which case I would go as barebones as possible hardware wise, install Linux and begin adding back devices until the issue occurs. Then you’ll know from where the issue stems. The only other thing I can suggest, is if you want to post your complete build specs I can have a look and see if there’s anything that stands out as a possible issue.

            As to why would Mint see only three monitors. I’ve seen this happen with different desktop environments. Some only support up to 3 monitors well if at all. Gnome does this as well. I was originally using Gnome until I did my Hydra build, but after adding the fourth monitor, I just could not get Gnome to use it no matter what I did. Try using XFCE4 and see if that fixes the fourth monitor issue for you.

          3. Malcolm Dean

            Thanks much. I’m replacing the mobo entirely to elminate the hardware uncertainty.

            As for Gnome, I found that Fedora 25 manages four monitors very well, but for some reason it will not save the configuration. If it had, none of this might have occurred.

          4. godlikemouse Post author

            Hi Malcolm,

            That’s one of the main reasons I stay away from RedHat OS, I switched over to Arch Linux a while back and I’ve never looked back. Overall, much better support in my opinion. Let me know if there’s anything else I can help with. Good luck.

          5. Malcolm Dean

            Following your advice, I’m moving to Manjaro. I read on their site a comment that the Cinnamon edition can handle high dpi monitors, but the XFCE edition cannot. Are the monitors in your photo high dpi?

          6. godlikemouse Post author

            Hi Malcolm,

            I’m not running HiDPI monitors, but I don’t think XFCE will have a problem running it. I see settings under the themes for HiDPI, so I would assume it would. I know Gnome and a few others support it so I would be really surprised if it didn’t work out.

  2. BigRed

    Help with Error message

    Your machine is an awesome build.

    I need help with my machine. After the build-out, I could not install linux mint 18 – cinnamon on it. I am able to boot from a DVD, however when the machine tries to open a live session the computer states unknown chipset and gives a black screen.

    After changing the boot path with “nomodeset”. I am able to boot into a live session (with default mint username and password). However, the live session freezes to a black screen and no output to the monitor.

    Also, there is not any graphic card on the motherboard, so I can not bypass the NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1060 card.

    Any help installing linux mint 18 – cinnamon will be welcomed.

    Machine:
    Processor : Intel® Core™ i7-6800K Processor (6x 3.40GHz/15MB L3 Cache) – Intel® Core™ i7-6800K w/ Intel Performance Tuning Protection
    Processor Cooling: Asetek 550LC (Standard 120mm Fan)
    Memory: 32 GB [4 GB x8] DDR4-2800 ADATA XPG
    Video Card: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1060 – 6GB (VR-Ready)
    Motherboard : ASUS X99-E — 3x PCIe x16, 5x USB 3.0, 1x USB 3.1, 1x M.2
    Power Supply: 1000 Watt – EVGA 1000 GQ – 80 PLUS Gold; Full Modular Advance Cabling Options
    Primary Hard Drive: 256 GB Samsung 850 Pro SSD — Read: 550MB/s, Write: 520MB/s – Single Drive
    Optical Drive: 24X Super Multi Interal DVD Rewriter Optical Drive – Black
    Sound Card: 3D Premium Surround Sound Onboard
    Network Card: Onboard LAN Network (Gb or 10/100)

    Reply
    1. godlikemouse Post author

      Hi BigRed,

      I wouldn’t think the Video Card would be a problem at this point. Setting the nomodeset was definitely a good call to bypass any video issues however, being that the machine is hanging on a black screen I’m leaning more towards the problem being something else. If I were you, the first thing I would do is switch media, maybe do a bootable USB drive or something, that way you can try a few different approaches without using up DVDs. Next, burning a new ISO image to your media and try it again, just to make sure the media is bad. You may also want to try a previous version (or perhaps another distro just to verify). If this still goes black, you may have a bad piece of hardware in the mix. Perhaps RAM or something else, I’m not sure. Let me know how it goes and we’ll see if we can move forward.

      Reply
      1. BigRed

        Hi godlikemouse,

        Some other information, i did an integrity check on the boot DVD and it passed, the boot DVD should not be bad. Also, I am thinking that changing the motherboard with one that has a built graphic card should help, provided the driver for that graphics card is located within Linux Boot kernel. What do you think about that? I am looking at the Intel H110, B150, H170, and Z170 chipsets.

        I will also try burning a new ISO image from a different source.

        Reply
  3. Zacariaz

    This is awesome however I’m not convinces I understand how this configuration works in practice.
    Each card take care of 4 monitors. Check
    Each card individually works with those 4 monitors as one screen. Check.
    This obviously causes problems, as the two cards don’t actually work together, as I understand it at least.

    But then you found a solution, another driver as it were, but while it didn’t enable SLI, it still enabled you to somehow use the two cards as one? Am I completely missing the something here, or is it reasonable to be confused?

    At any rate it obviously works, which is very interesting to me, but are there really no limitations that you’ve experienced? Could you for example, theoretically at least, play a game in full screen mode, covering all 8 monitors, or how about just a movie? I know it wouldn’t be a practical application in your case, but for what I have in mind, it actually would.

    Another question…
    Do you think something similar would be possible using AMD cards instead?
    I’m asking for a number of reason, partly because I believe that AMD will become the high end graphics of choice for Linux users in the near future, as they seem to have turned over a new leaf, and because the monitors I’m interested in uses freesync/adaptive sync, as opposed to Nvidias proprietary gsync, or whatever it’s called. Nvidia could chose to simply play ball, but I rather doubt it, so AMD will likely be preferable for me in the years to come.

    Also what I really want to do involves only 3 screens, but basically the same amount of pixels, so to speak, so I would rather like to split it up on two or three cards.

    Anyway, best of luck and best regards.

    Reply
    1. godlikemouse Post author

      Hi Zacariaz,

      I see where you might be a little confused, basically what I was able to do was to take the 2 separate GPUs and compose them into a single screen by using Nvidia’s Base Mosaic setting.

      Regarding playing games across all screens, I don’t do that, I usually just send all my gaming directly to one screen. I have however watched movies across all screens and there was no issue with that. I tend not to game across multiple monitors because I don’t like the break across the screens when I’m gaming, I have a large screen LCD that I play games on, this is just for work (and some fun) mainly.

      I’ve heard people complaining about AMD video cards and I myself haven’t had good luck with AMD as a whole so I tend to stay clear of them. I have however seen that they have Catalyst support available that might be able to do what you’re trying to do. My setup doesn’t have anything proprietary outside the Nvidia video cards and drivers themselves, the monitors are just vanilla with DisplayPort 1.2 support.

      Hope this helps.

      Reply
      1. Zacariaz

        I was more interested whether or not it was possible, not to actually game over multiple monitors, at least not with a setup like yours. 😉
        Glad to hear that apparently it is possible.

        As for the AMD question, I guess we’ll just have to wait and see, but in general I’ve heard that the new driver, albeit not at all perfect yet, works rather well, so I suppose it just a matter of AMD implementing all of the relevant technologies, which I do believe they will, unlike Nvidia I’m sorry to say.

        Anyway, thanks for the reply.

        Reply
  4. Technicus

    Hey, can you give me some tips?

    I have a Radeon RX 460 and I am trying to setup 3 monitors. I can only get 2 at a time.

    Properly configuring the xorg.conf file would more than likely be how to get it to work, but it is a mystery to me.

    Here is the system configuration information: .

    Reply
    1. godlikemouse Post author

      Hi Technicus,

      Unfortunately, your system information didn’t make it into the comment. However, have you tried running the ATI Catalyst software, it would probably help you automated the changes you’re looking to make for the Xorg.conf. Also, what distro are you running? I might be able to find something else to help in the event that the Catalyst software doesn’t work for you.

      Reply
        1. godlikemouse Post author

          Hi Technicus,

          Once you have your monitors daisy chained (physically connected), they should show up as individual display devices when you run “xrandr”. You should see something that matches at least the count of daisy chained devices displayed. Are you seeing that?

          Reply
          1. Technicus

            Hey thanks!

            I have the devices connected with a display-port hub, but they only show up as one so all screens are identical. How do I get the system to recognize that there are multiple screens?

  5. greg

    You’re a lifesaver! I’ve spent six weeks trying to figure out how to use multiple GPUs together. Have you tried any other desktops? How did you know which desktops support multiple GPUs?

    Reply
    1. godlikemouse Post author

      Awesome! Glad to help. The multiple GPU desktop was really just trial and error. I started with Gnome, then tried KDE, then tried Fluxbox (success) then tried XFCE4 (success). If there’s a specific desktop you’d like to try just go for it and see if it works 🙂

      Reply
  6. Guy

    I’ve got a dual-monitor setup with a GTX750TI, but whenever I try to do a full-screen game it picks whichever monitor is at 0,0 — basically I can only play a game on one monitor. Any idea how I could get programs to recognize both screens as a single monitor with a large resolution? It’s great for work otherwise, but it seems like a bit of a waste for gaming.

    Reply
    1. godlikemouse Post author

      Hi Guy,

      Sure, it really depends on the driver and the settings you have available. If you have an option available to compose both monitors into a single screen “Screen0” then you should be able to run across both. You may also want to try a different desktop to see if it has built in support for it.

      Reply
  7. Reality Master

    Turn a couple of those monitors 90°. If your setup isn’t soul draining and performance isn’t horrific, I’ll switch to nvidia.

    Reply

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